Welcome to Omaha Integrative Care

At Omaha Integrative Care, we offer counseling or coaching, yoga, massage, nutritional services, acupuncture, and meditation or mind / body medicine classes.

One of the things that sets Omaha Integrative Care apart is that we're the only location in the region that has all of those services under one roof.

One of the things we hear often from our clients is that when People come in, they feel like they're coming into a Sanctuary.

We're very picky about, not only who works here, but what we offer. All of the products we offer, right now, are through Pulling Down the Moon, and their products are triple-tested and the highest quality.

We really just want to help you to enjoy life to the fullest.

What is integrative care?

Integrative care combines traditional western medicine with complementary therapies such as yoga, nutrition, acupuncture, massage and counseling. A defining component to integrative care is that the complementary treatments are research-based and not meant to take the place of traditional medicine, but to support the whole person during treatment. Most importantly, integrative care is about treating the whole person and looking at all aspects of life – physical, emotional and spiritual.

Shop Our Products Online

In our online store we have gathered a selection of items that we feel are the best offer for women who are trying to become pregnant. Whether you are trying "naturally" or using medical means like Invitro Fertilization (IVF), you will find what you need in our array of yoga for fertility DVDs, fertility books and many nutritional products - all chosen to support the fertility journey.
  Omaha Integrative Care Video


"When people come in, they feel like they're coming into a sanctuary"


Julie tells her story about OIC


"there needs to be something for people going through this"


Omaha Integrative Care Store

Omaha Integrative Care Store
Shop our online store for
integrative care products.
NEWS AND UPDATES

Mindful Moment: Transitions

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-four-season-tree-image22948777

Spring is one of the most apparent transitions of life.  One day may be cool and windy and the next sunny and warm.  This variety of weather is a reminder of the many every day transitions in life.

Change is a natural part of life and with change comes transition from one moment to the next.  We move from the weekend to the work week; from sleeping to waking; from one room to another; or one task to a new one.  Being mindful of transitions provides an opportunity to continually ground ourselves in the present moment, remembering that each moment is fresh and unique.

This week, consider practicing mindfulness during those transitions.  When you come home from the day or transition into a new task or role try these steps:

  • Take a breath and acknowledge the new place or position you are in.
  • Spend a few moments moving mindfully through this new space.  Bring attention to each action such as stepping forward, setting down your keys, changing directions.
  • Use all of our senses to orient to the space you are now in.  Notice what you see, smell, hear, feel and even taste.
  • Bring your thoughts to the moment in front of you.  You may even want to silently narrate your transition.  For example, you may silently say to yourself “and now I am home.”
  • Gently note any emotional or physical response to the change in scenery.  After noting it as good information, let it go and bring yourself back to the present moment.

You can use this technique with small or big transitions.  Practicing with smaller transitions such as entering your office or getting into your car is good practice for the bigger changes in life.

Mindful moments are short exercises to be used throughout your week to relax, integrate and center yourself.  Inspired by the wisdom traditions and science, mindful moments are meant to be accessible and simple enough for anyone to practice.  Many teachers and leaders in integrative medicine have influenced our approach to mindful moments. Jon Kabat-Zinn defines mindfulness as “paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.”  Look for the weekly mindful moment every Monday.  May it support you in finding your center to live life to the fullest.

 

Yoga for Stress Relief

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-yoga-outdoors-image19143623Stress is something we all have to varying degrees.  And, we see stress in different ways.  What may be stressful for one person registers very low on the stress monitor for another.  It gets pretty complicated and personal, which is why stress gets such a bad rap.

But, stress isn’t all bad.  Some stress is needed for us to get up and go.  How we perceive and how we handle our stress is what makes the difference for our emotional and physical health.  Dr. Kelly McGonigal talks about how perception can make all the difference when it comes to stress in this Ted Talk. Yet, according to this NPR article about the impact of stress on our health and family, 1 out of 4 Americans report they experienced a great deal of stress in the last month.  Basically, you are not alone in feeling a bit overwhelmed.  The good news is there are things you can do about it, including yoga.

Yoga is one of the most effective ways of reducing stress while also improving your flexibility and overall fitness (see Yoga: Fight stress and find serenity).  What we most like about yoga for de-stressing is that it is one of the most accessible mind body approaches. Yoga incorporates movements that encourage relaxation in the body as well as breathing and meditative practices that help soothe a busy mind.  Despite what many think (visualize pretzel like poses), anyone can do yoga and you don’t have to be super bendy or wear trendy clothes.

We are excited to offer a new drop in class Yoga for Stress Relief on Wednesdays from 6-7 PM.  We hope this easy mid-week class will become part of your stress reduction plan!

Want more information?  Email us:

Mindful Moment: Waiting

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-feet-people-waiting-room-different-sitting-image32870956Waiting. We spend quite a bit of time waiting in life.  We wait on the phone; in line at checkout; to get seated at a restaurant; to take our turn; to board a plane or train.  We tend to view this time as negative or unproductive.  So, we get out our phones to text or read or game.

 

We want the red light to turn more quickly and for our turn to come up faster than it will. The bottom line is we don’t like to wait.

Interestingly, despite the fact that we can’t seem to tolerate the waiting, we spend quite a bit of our time thinking about the future or past versus being in the present moment.  A study out of Harvard found that we spend about 47% of our waking time not thinking about what we are doing in that moment.  When experiencing waiting, we shift to thinking about what is coming up next in the day or week or re-hashing what happened earlier. But, isn’t that also waiting?  Waiting for something else to come, waiting for things to be different. It is not surprising that this study also reported that happiness is related to those times in which we are present.  This is another reason to practice mindfulness — even when we are waiting.

This week, when you find yourself waiting, instead of getting frustrated or annoyed, try using the opportunity to practice your mindfulness.  Focus on the moment — even if it is irritating or annoying.  Notice that emotion, then let it pass.  Notice what’s around you, how you feel, what you are experiencing.  When you find your thoughts going towards the future or past, gently take a breath and bring yourself back to the moment you are in.

Opportunities to Practice “Waiting” Mindfulness:

  • Standing in line anywhere
  • Pumping gas
  • Waiting for the elevator
  • Anticipating vacation or going home
  • At red lights
  • During your commute
  • At the doctor’s office
  • Anytime you find yourself having to “wait”

Mindful moments are short exercises to be used throughout your week to relax, integrate and center yourself.  Inspired by the wisdom traditions and science, mindful moments are meant to be accessible and simple enough for anyone to practice.  Many teachers and leaders in integrative medicine have influenced our approach to mindful moments. Jon Kabat-Zinn defines mindfulness as “paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.”  Look for the weekly mindful moment every Monday.  May it support you in finding your center to live life to the fullest.

Mindful Moment: Waiting

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-feet-people-waiting-room-different-sitting-image32870956Waiting. We spend quite a bit of time waiting in life.  We wait on the phone; in line at checkout; to get seated at a restaurant; to take our turn; to board a plane or train.  We tend to view this time as negative or unproductive.  So, we get out our phones to text or read or game.

 

We want the red light to turn more quickly and for our turn to come up faster than it will. The bottom line is we don’t like to wait.

Interestingly, despite the fact that we can’t seem to tolerate the waiting, we spend quite a bit of our time thinking about the future or past versus being in the present moment.  A study out of Harvard found that we spend about 47% of our waking time not thinking about what we are doing in that moment.  When experiencing waiting, we shift to thinking about what is coming up next in the day or week or re-hashing what happened earlier. But, isn’t that also waiting?  Waiting for something else to come, waiting for things to be different. It is not surprising that this study also reported that happiness is related to those times in which we are present.  This is another reason to practice mindfulness — even when we are waiting.

This week, when you find yourself waiting, instead of getting frustrated or annoyed, try using the opportunity to practice your mindfulness.  Focus on the moment — even if it is irritating or annoying.  Notice that emotion, then let it pass.  Notice what’s around you, how you feel, what you are experiencing.  When you find your thoughts going towards the future or past, gently take a breath and bring yourself back to the moment you are in.

Opportunities to Practice “Waiting” Mindfulness:

  • Standing in line anywhere
  • Pumping gas
  • Waiting for the elevator
  • Anticipating vacation or going home
  • At red lights
  • During your commute
  • At the doctor’s office
  • Anytime you find yourself having to “wait”

Mindful moments are short exercises to be used throughout your week to relax, integrate and center yourself.  Inspired by the wisdom traditions and science, mindful moments are meant to be accessible and simple enough for anyone to practice.  Many teachers and leaders in integrative medicine have influenced our approach to mindful moments. Jon Kabat-Zinn defines mindfulness as “paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.”  Look for the weekly mindful moment every Monday.  May it support you in finding your center to live life to the fullest.http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-feet-people-waiting-room-different-sitting-image32870956

Come relax with us – Community Acupuncture Tonight

com acu pic 1aIf you have been wondering about community acupuncture you can experience the relaxation tonight.  Last week one person commented “it was the most relaxed I’ve been all week.” Another said: “Best thing I did that week. It was a calm and peaceful environment where I was comfortable and informed about the acupuncture I received.  Perfect for a first time acupuncture experience and I will be back.”   So, we thought we should try Monday to give you the opportunity to start the week off right.

During community acupuncture, our licensed acupuncturist and holistic practitioner Dr. Bonnie Heidel-Arnold will place acupuncture needles in ear points for reducing stress.  If you like, Sara Comstock, LMT can also provide a reflexology treatment to further elicit the relaxation response.  You will spend about 20-30 minutes enjoying this experience in a relaxing chair with healing music and aromatherapy.

Sessions are $30 for acupuncture and additional $20 for added reflexology.  Per Nebraska Regulations you will need to bring or have on file with us a referral letter from your physician.  You can use this form or complete the form below and we will be happy to coordinate with your physician.

Need to schedule a time?  Just let us know and we can make sure you have your time reserved.